Making Fans out of our Friends.

Making Fans out of our Friends.

At this years Billboard awards Drake took the time during one of his acceptance speeches to address a topic this generation/society is too guilty of. Drake took the stage after his 12th win and says, "You know I had a close friend of mine that didn't support my album, but then like supported other people's stuff and I asked him 'Why?' and their response was 'I don't want to look thirsty when you get enough love as it is.' ‘And it made me think that you know it's crazy that we're all here on earth, [pauses to laugh], for a limited amount of time and we gotta show love while we're here.” Drake then proceed on thanking some of his colleagues and telling them how much he admired them. "It's crazy that we're all here on earth for a limited amount of time, and we gotta show love while we're here," he said on stage midway through the telecast, before getting straight to the point: "Vanessa Hudgens, you look incredible tonight."

It was that moment that sparked this write up. One of this generation’s biggest influential artist addressed a social issue we all deal with. Why is it hard for us to support those we love? While scrolling through IG or any other social media you are now exposed to others, some you may know, others you may not, promoting their projects and trying to get recognition from their peers as they try to pursue their dreams or make a living. We are lucky to have such platforms that allow us (with just a click) to showcase our work to hundreds and thousands of people. But you will notice that not all those close to you take the time or effort to show love. Even if it just means to double tap on their phone screen or a repost of your work. Many of us will admire or “troll” others’ social medias and because of pride or  "to not look thirsty” we won't like, comment, repost, or even send a DM of appreciation to the person. Why is that?

From personal experience, when we launched Morir Soñando, we learned the harsh rule that not everyone will show support. We learned that people have different reasons to be reserved about liking, commenting, or reposting anything relating to the blog. First, many people in our generation are building brands and not everything sticks. Some don’t follow through or others just don’t execute correctly. I remember listening to a podcast of a local DJ and he having a guest that is a very influential person in our neighborhood, saying that he didn’t support anyone unless he knew they were serious about it. That was about 2 years ago and it stuck with me when we launched the site. People don’t want to put their name out there for you unless they know you are serious about it. So, if you want people to show support be serious and give it your best. Lesson #1.

Second reason why some might not show love is because of your reaction. We grew up in the culture that tells you “hop of my D#&K” or “why you jocking me.” Yet if you have a project you are working on, especially a means of making a living, you want your peers to be supporters. You want others to enjoy what you've created and show support. I think we all have this filter ingrained in us from growing up that we don’t want to “sweat” anyone too much so they won’t get too in their heads. And this is Lesson #2. Be humble and show love the way you want others to show you love. As a team, we like to show others love on the spot. We cease every moment. We tell others what we think of their work. We've learned how to reach out and show support. We've learned that it is important to put pride aside and declare ourselves fans of others work. In return this has allowed us to get the love we need to grow our brand, even from strangers. We've learned to treat others how we want to be treated by being open and inviting.

Now to the response Drake’s friend gave him. His friend said “you get enough love as it is”. And for this one I am going to piggyback on some Drake lyrics when in the song “Say Something” he raps, “Cause what's a star when it's most important fan is missing?” The work we do as artists and content creators comes from a personal space. When you open up and put your work out there as an extension of your character, the feedback of those closes to you means the most. These are the people that know you and can give you valuable feedback. You want to hear from them. You want them to take the time to see the work you did as a reflection of your persona. For us, we learned to use this as a tool to weed out those who mean the most to us. We value those friends that have taken the time to reach out and say "GREAT BLOG!" Or "I love this piece!". These are all tools of growth we use to guide us in what direction we are going and who will not be going along for the ride. We don’t take it personal but we do take it as an educational experience.

With these learnings, we ask others to put pride aside and support artists and content creators. Anyone with a project that you admire, SHOW LOVE! Show love while you can. Tomorrow they might not be around, you might not be around, or their work might not be around because they got discouraged. If you are a close friend or a stranger, it is appreciated and it can be that little push that is needed to continue working on our crafts. We might have been raised with negative connotations when it comes to supporting others but we can change that and create a community where we support others. We want “simply to make groupie fans of my peers” (Drake’s Man of the Year REMIX).

 

The Cycle of Dating

The Cycle of Dating

Jealous... ME?! No Way.

Jealous... ME?! No Way.

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